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Mario Del Monaco is a Actor Italien born on 27 july 1915 at Florence (Italie)

Mario Del Monaco

Mario Del Monaco
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Nationality Italie
Birth 27 july 1915 at Florence (Italie)
Death 16 october 1982 (at 67 years) at Venice (Italie)

Mario Del Monaco (July 27, 1915 – October 16, 1982) was an Italian tenor, regarded by some as the greatest dramatic tenor of the 20th century.

Biography

Del Monaco was born in Florence to a musical upper-class family. As a young boy he studied the violin but had a passion for singing. He graduated from the Rossini Conservatory at Pesaro, where he first met and sang with Renata Tebaldi, with whom he would form something of an operatic dream team of the 1950s. His early mentors as a singer included Arturo Melocchi, his teacher at Pesaro, and Maestro Raffaelli, who recognized his talent and helped launch his career.

That career began in earnest with Del Monaco's debut on December 31, 1940, as Pinkerton at the Puccini Theater in Milan. (His initial appearance in an opera had occurred the previous year, however, in Mascagni's Cavalleria rusticana in Pesaro.) He sang in Italy during the Second World War and married, in 1941, Rina Filipini. In 1946, he appeared at London's Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, for the first time. During the ensuing years he became famous not only in London but also across the operatic world for his powerful, metallic voice. It was almost heldentenor-like in scope but Del Monaco was no Wagnerian, confining his activities overwhelmingly to the Italian repertoire.

Del Monaco sang at the New York Metropolitan Opera from 1951 to 1959, enjoying particular success in dramatic Verdi parts such as Radamès. He soon established himself as one of four Italian tenor superstars who reached the peak of their fame in the 1950s and '60s, the others being Giuseppe Di Stefano, Carlo Bergonzi and Franco Corelli. Del Monaco's trademark roles during this period were Giordano's Andrea Chénier and Verdi's Otello. He first tackled Otello in 1950 and kept refining his interpretation throughout his career. It is said that he sang Otello an astonishing 427 times. However, the book published by Elisabetta Romagnolo, Mario Del Monaco, Monumentum aere perennius, Azzali 2002, lists only 218 appearances by him as Otello, which is a more realistic figure. Aptly, the tenor was buried in his Otello costume. Although Otello was his best role, throughout his career, Del Monaco sang a number of other roles with great acclaim, for example: Canio in Pagliacci (Leoncavallo), Radames in Aida (Verdi), Don Jose in Carmen (Bizet), Chenier in Andrea Chénier (Giordano), Manrico in Il trovatore (Verdi), Samson in Samson and Delilah (Saint-Saëns), and Don Alvaro in La forza del destino (Verdi).

Del Monaco made his first recordings in Milan in 1948 for HMV. Later, he was partnered by Renata Tebaldi in a long series of Verdi and Puccini operas recorded for Decca. On the same label was his 1969 recording of Giordano's Fedora, opposite Magda Olivero and Tito Gobbi.

His ringing voice and virile appearance earned him the nickname of the "Brass Bull of Milan". Despite his idomatic phrasing, he was still widely criticized for being unsubtle and unyielding in his vocal interpretations. In this regard, the soprano Magda Olivero noted in a recent interview that:

"When del Monaco and I sang Francesca da Rimini together at La Scala [in 1959] he explained his whole vocal technique to me. When he finished I said, "My dear del Monaco, if I had to put into practice all the things you’ve told me, I’d stop singing right away and just disappear." The technique was so complicated: you push the larynx down, then you push this up, then you do that—in short, it made my head spin just to hear everything he did.

"We recorded Francesca excerpts together [in 1969]. Francesca has a beautiful phrase, "Paolo, datemi pace," marked "piano," and then Paolo enters with "Inghirlandata di violette," which also should be sung softly, delicately. Instead, del Monaco was terrible—he bellowed the phrase [she imitates him and laughs]! When he listened to the playback he exclaimed, "I can’t believe it! After that soft poetic phrase I come in and what do I sound like—a boxer punching with his fists!" He recorded the phrase again, but the second attempt was more or less the same because he was incapable of singing piano. He was furious with himself because he wanted to. He tried everything, but his technique would not permit him to sing softly since it totally was based on the muscles."



In 1975 he retired from the stage. He died in Mestre as a result of nephritis.

Del Monaco belonged to a once flourishing lineage of dramatic tenors born in Italy. Famous predecessors of his included Francesco Tamagno, Francesco Signorini, Giuseppe Borgatti, Giovanni Zenatello, Edoardo Ferrari-Fontana, Bernardo de Muro, Giovanni Martinelli, Aureliano Pertile and Francesco Merli, among others.

His niece Donella Del Monaco, a soprano, is the singer of Opus Avantra.

Usually with

Dino Risi
Dino Risi
(2 films)
Emilio Cigoli
Emilio Cigoli
(2 films)
Ugo Tognazzi
Ugo Tognazzi
(2 films)
Source : Wikidata

Filmography of Mario Del Monaco (5 films)

Display filmography as list

Actor

First Love
First Love (1978)

Directed by Dino Risi
Genres Drama, Romance
Actors Ugo Tognazzi, Ornella Muti, Riccardo Billi, Mario Del Monaco, Caterina Boratto, Venantino Venantini
Roles director
Rating65% 3.273413.273413.273413.273413.27341
Ex-gloire de la comédie, Picchio tombe amoureux de Renata, jeune infirmière de la Villa Serena, la maison de retraite pour anciens acteurs de théâtre dans laquelle il vient d'arriver. Il décide de la suivre à Rome, pour vivre la première aventure amoureuse de sa retraite.
First Love
First Love (1978)
, 1h58
Directed by Dino Risi
Origin Italie
Genres Drama, Romance
Themes Vieillesse
Actors Ugo Tognazzi, Ornella Muti, Mario Del Monaco, Venantino Venantini, Riccardo Billi, Caterina Boratto
Roles directeur
Rating65% 3.273413.273413.273413.273413.27341
Picchio, un ancien comédien sur la cinquantaine, tombe amoureux d'une jeune employée de ménage de sa maison de retraite à San Pellegrino, dans le nord de l'Italie et décide de l'emmener à Capri et Rome pour la séduire, mais aussi pour relancer sa carrière de comique. La désillusion sera immense...
Beautiful but Dangerous, 1h47
Directed by Robert Z. Leonard
Origin Italie
Genres Drama, Comedy, Musical, Romance
Actors Gina Lollobrigida, Vittorio Gassman, Robert Alda, Anne Vernon, Tamara Lees, Mario Del Monaco
Roles Silvani
Rating59% 2.966982.966982.966982.966982.96698
Lina (Gina Lollo) was an orphan, brought up by her adopted mother getting trained for music. Her mother became sick due to heart attack on the stage, and Lina will go to the stage in place of her mother. But a group of teaser will tease her, by connecting her mother name too and will not allow to perform. From the balcony a person, the prince of Russia, Sergio (Vittorio Gassman) will come down and make the teaser group go out of the theater and asks Lina to perform. It was a very good performance, but at the end she will come to know that mother had another attack, so been send to the long distance hospital. By the night she wanted to go, but there was no way to. Sergio will offer her lift to the hospital, and on the way he will come to know each other. The prince will not tell his real identity, but will say only that he came there for horse competition in the local club, and he stays regularly Paris and he is from Russia. By reaching the hospital, she will left her hand bag in the coach, Sergio by seeing that will put enough money and his golden ring in that, and give the bag to Lina. In hurry she will enter the hospital, and will find her mother is no more.
Guai ai vinti
Genres Drama
Themes Political films
Actors Lea Padovani, Anna Maria Ferrero, Pierre Cressoy, Clelia Matania, Camillo Pilotto, Gualtiero Tumiati
Roles Mario Abbate
Rating65% 3.254843.254843.254843.254843.25484
During the First World War the Italian front at Caporetto is overwhelmed by an attack of adverse troops. Luisa and her sister Clara remain in their villa, prisoners of the Austrians. They are forced to undergo all sorts of violence, so that Mirella, the little daughter of Luisa, lost the use of the word following the trauma.